Statement on Funding of Medical Training

Well organised and financed medical education and postgraduate training are the basic elements in ensuring a functioning Health Care Systems in Europe. Therefore the EJD published this statement.

The European Commission in the Communication to the European Parliament, the Council of the EU, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions “Towards a job-rich recovery” indicated that healthcare has a great potential for job creation, that healthcare professionals are needed for ageing EU population and that challenges faced by the healthcare sector will be addressed in an Action Plan for the EU Health Workforce.  

In the “Green Paper on the Health Workforce for Health” the European Commission indicated the problems of ageing workers and of global shortages in healthcare workforce.

Well organised and financed medical education and postgraduate training are the basic elements in ensuring a functioning Health Care Systems in Europe. Therefore the undersigned medical organizations state the following:

  • Universities that provide Basic Medical Education must be sufficiently financed. As a functioning Health Care System will need physicians with broad knowledge and well developed clinical skills these Universities must be well equipped and provide a reasonable teacher to student ratio.
  • There should not be any financial obligations that inhibit the pursuit of Basic Medical Education.
  • Medical Students that run through full-time clinical clerkships or research projects must have a labour contract under the same conditions as other employees within the organisation and be paid adequately to their position and appropriate in their efforts
  • Obligations to stay in the country, region or place after finishing Basic Medical Education or specialisation are opposed strongly, as they interfere with the principles of a free Market and free Mobility of professionals in Europe. Furthermore the threats of punishment or fines in this context are strongly rejected.
  • In the interest of the quality of Health Care appropriately resources must be provided for specialisation and research in medicine. This process is considered as work within the health care system and therefore must be remunerated adequately.
  • The standards and quality must be guaranteed and supervised by the national responsible authorities.

European Junior Doctors
Prague, May 11th 2013